A Little Something…


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    Drangabrauð with butter and cheese: 600 kr

    Our Drangabrauð, or potato bread is a special family recipe from my mother-in-law and goes back generations…

In the 18th century the first crop of Icelandic potatoes were harvested at Bessastaðir, where the Icelandic President has his residency. But it was not until the early 20th century that potatoes became part of every day fare. Drangar was an extremely poor part of Iceland, located on the west coast of Iceland and residents had very little food. They included potatoes in their bread-baking and generations have used the same ingredients; kneading it, rolling it out by hand, and baking it on a hot pan.

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    Plokkfiskur with Icelandic Lava bread & cheese: 1300 kr

    My mother made this at least once a week out of poached haddock and leftovers…. shhh!

Plokkfiskur is a traditional Icelandic dish, and translates to “Mashed Fish”. The dish served here is made with fresh white fish, and varies according to the catch of the day.

Lava bread is made of rye because it is particularly easy to grow, and survives harsher climate in poor soil. It is traditionally baked underground in Iceland using Geothermal energy. It takes up to 12 hours to cook, and is doughy, moist and sweet. But not everyone has easy access to geothermal energy. My mother used to bake it in the oven on a low heat overnight.

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    Flatbrauð, served with hangikjöt: 800 kr

    My mother used to get together with her mother and sisters and bake it on the kitchen stove in my grandparents’ house…

Flatbrauð is made from rye-flour and hot water. The bread is kneaded and flattened into a round form by a cake roller or by hand, picked and baked on a hot stove or in ashes. Now it is a popular feature on the coffee table. Our flatbrauð is served with hangikjöt, smoked lamb cut into thin slices.


A Little More…


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    Heida’s creamy mushroom-soup, served with franskbrauð: 1600 kr

    Only my sister Heida and I know what makes the characteristic flavour of this soup…

When I was a child fresh mushrooms were not available in Iceland and the soup served in my home used to be made from tinned mushrooms. But in 1983 my sister visited London. She came home with a new experience, and evangelised fresh mushrooms into our family. For many years she tried out different recipes and has now made the perfect one, served here with Franskbrauð–the Icelandic take on French white bread.

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    Gæsabakki (Goose Paté) served with bread & three sauces: 2200 kr

    The goose served here, is brought to the café by my son-in-law from the highlands…

Heiðargæs–a pink-footed goose–breeds in Iceland, Greenland and Svalbard; it has been part of the Icelandic food table throughout the ages. My father used to bring home Heiðargæs during my childhood, and my mother originally cooked it whole in the oven, with just salt and pepper. Now I serve it spiced, smoked and as a paté with three sauces–horseradish sauce, blueberry jam and my mother’s spiced redcurrant marmalade.

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    Elsa’s creamy Nordic fish-soup, served with Drangabrauð: 1800 kr

    If you want to know the secret ingredient… just ask Laufey (but don’t tell anyone)!

Icelandic fish soup can be found almost everywhere. It embodies the nation’s tradition where fish is a part of everyday life. Nowadays many soups also include white wine but since wine used to be luxury in Iceland, our family recipe never used it. Instead, my mother used a secret ingredient, making the distinctive flavour of the soup served here. We use Nordic white fish in our soup, but the variation of fish depends on the catch of the day. Served with Drangabrauð.


Sweet Secrets…


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    Djöflaterta, Icelandic chocolate cake, served with whipped cream: 800 kr

    In our family recipe, we use beetroot, to make it even darker, richer and softer.

Djöflaterta–the devil’s cake–is one that brings back childhood memories for most Icelandic people, and each family has its own recipe. The cake is soft and fluffy, and originates from North America. What distinguishes Djöflaterta from chocolate cake, is the use of cocoa instead of melted chocolate and coffee or hot water instead of milk. The first known recipe dates back to 1905. Our cake is served with whipped cream and is heavenly with a glass of cold milk.

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    Eplakaka, Classic Icelandic apple cake, with whipped cream: 800 kr

    Apples were among the first fruits Icelandic households could buy, but were rationed to one box a year per family.

Fruit in general was not easily available in Iceland until the fifties. They were typically available in December, before the Christmas season and so apple cake became part of household festivities and was regarded as a luxury. The apple cake served here, was made by my grandmother, and is flavoured with cinnamon, served lukewarm, with whipped cream.

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    Marengsbakkelse - Merengue cake with fresh berries: 800 kr

    If you want to know the secret ingredient… just ask Laufey (but shhh, don’t tell anyone)!

No Icelandic birthday celebrations are complete without a Meringue cake. Like many other classic cakes in Iceland, each family has its own favourite. My mother used blueberries or redcurrants before other types of fresh fruit and berries were available in Iceland. Later she started to use banana, kiwi and strawberries. We serve the merengue cake with whipped cream and a variety of fresh seasonal berries.


And to drink…?


Americano

Double Espresso

Swiss Mocha

Latte Macchiato

Caramel Macchiato

Cappucino

Café Latte

Iced Coffee

400 kr

700 kr

700 kr

700 kr

700 kr

700 kr

700 kr

700 kr

Irish Coffee

Pukka teas

House white wine

House red wine

Icelandic beers

Full fat milk

Soft drinks

Juice

1200 kr

700 kr

1200 kr

1200 kr

1200 kr

400 kr

400 kr

400 kr